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Songs

Christie
Songs
 
Songs by The Epics and Acid Gallery
 

No Pleasing You

Goes To Show cover

Goes To Show

Travelling Circus

Maypole

Johan

SINGLES

THE EPICS
There's Just No Pleasing You
My Little Girl

Just How Wrong Can You Be
Blue Turns To Grey

Travelling Circus
Henry Long


ACID GALLERY
Dance Around The Maypole
Right Toe Blues


JOHAN LIND
Yesterday Man
Every Day

 

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The Epics' music was characterised by two main features: Stuart Tann's superb vocals and Vic Elmes' fantastic guitar-playing (and remember, he was only a teenager at the time). They also had the good fortune of being offered some terrific songs written by great songwriters.
   Click on The Epics for more information on the group.

There's Just No Pleasing You
(J DeShannon)

The first single had an A-side penned by Jackie DeShannon, who wrote many hits for other performers (notably the Searchers) as well as herself. The fast-paced song is certainly very commercial and well-produced, with superb harmonies and a standout lead vocal performance from Stuart, including a Lennon-esque refrain.The Epics can feel deservedly proud of their debut effort.

My Little Girl (Tann/Elmes)

Stuart and Vic Elmes penned the flipside. Although Stuart reckons it was an amateurish first-up effort, it really isn't too bad. The lyrics may be trite, but the song has a decent melody and rocks along nicely, embellished by a great guitar solo by Vic, showing what a talent he was even at so young an age.

Goes To Show (Just How
Wrong You Can Be)
(PF Sloan)

The Epics' next single was just about the perfect pop single. The A-side was this wonderfully tuneful offering, written by the great PF Sloan, the man behind the Grassroots and hits such as Eve of Destruction and Danger Man. The simple arrangement of this song, again held up by Stuart's brilliant vocals, made it a mini-pop masterpiece. Equally as good was the B-side ...

Blue Turns To Grey
(K Richards/M Jagger)

The band came up with a tremendous, melodic arrangement of this song, which far outshines the original by The Rolling Stones, or the minor hit version by Cliff Richard.  Indeed, it was because the latter chose to put out his version that The Epics were prevented from releasing this song as an A-side. Had this not occurred, The Epics may well have had a hit with this production, which sounds like a cross between The Searchers and Gerry and the Pacemakers.

Travelling Circus
(Blakley/Hawkes)

For the group's third single, Tremeloes writers Alan Blakley and Chip Hawkes contributed songs to both sides. The songs showed a harder edge reminiscent of the psychedelic sounds around at the time. Travelling Circus was simply that - a tale about a circus, with a little pschological insight at the end of the song. The Tremeloes also recorded a version of this song.

Henry Long (Blakley/Hawkes)

The flip is a story of an absent-minded man named Henry Long, and has a better melody line than the A-side. As with all the Epics' efforts, there is nothing lacking in the band's playing ability and the overall production. There is also another of Vic's wailing guitar breaks.


Dance Round The Maypole
(R Wood)

Think Roy Wood, think Wizzard, think The Move, and you have the essential mood of this song - not surprising, since it was written, sung and produced by Roy Wood himself. Acid Gallery was the short-lived, new name the Epics took on, and their first and only single was this nice, catchy piece with innocuous but at times very pretty lyrics:
   "Let's go dancing on the green, Fair girls one to seventeen .. "
   "Bluebells round the cherry tree, This girl gave them all to me .."
   The single did not sell because no-one knew who Acid Gallery was .. but the song would've been a surefire hit had Roy's own band at the time, The Move, released it.

Right Toe Blues (Blakley/Jansen/Elmes/Ross)

Probably an ad hoc jam, the absolute highlight of the piece is Vic's guitar work, which electrifies right from the start and carries on right throughout the song.


Yesterday Man (C Andrews)

The Epics backed Danish singer Johan Lind on this Chris Andrews song, released as Denmark's first ever stereo single. In a nice reading of the piece, the highlight is a lovely little instrumental break performed by the Epics.

Every Day (B Holly)

A straightforward, uncomplicated version of the Buddy Holly song.